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Paideia III


Luther College Alumni, Parents and Friends are invited to join one of our Virtual Alumni Book Clubs! The clubs were formed to engage our constituents with faculty emeriti and with one another.
 

Find out more HERE
Educated
Tara Westover
Hardcover | Feb 2018
2 in store $28.00
China Men
Maxine Hong Kingston
Paperback | Apr 1989
1 in store $16.95
"Growing Up Decorah: A Short Story" by Peter Ylvisaker '84See more
Growing Up Decorah is not a National Book Award winner and will not make the New York Times best-seller list. Thanks, however, to word-of-mouth and the wonders of social media, this memoir by Luther College graduate Peter Ylvisaker ’84 is generating enough Oneota Valley buzz to warrant a conversation.

Ylvisaker, son of Dr. Richard Ylvisaker ’50 and Joanne Ylvisaker moved to Decorah as a toddler in the mid-60s, and stumbled his way through childhood on Leif Erikson Drive and Meadow Court before traveling two small-town blocks to the Luther campus, where he applied himself just enough to earn an English degree. Growing Up Decorah is a coming-of-age story that is equal parts silly, sentimental and tragic. It is also the tale of a town – a magical place that continues to forgive the misdeeds of youth. 

Black Lives Matter: "How to Be an Antiracist" by Ibram X. KendiSee more
A black woman said to her white friends: “I’ll be happy to talk to you about my experience. But do the work first.” This five-week book club is a start to “doing the work,” educating ourselves in order to understand the current movement following the killing of George Floyd and other black Americans. We will devote the first three weeks to our reading of Ibram X. Kendi’s thought provoking How to Be an Antiracist (2019).

In the last two weeks participants may choose to read or simply to listen to discussion of two other perspectives: James Baldwin’s classic, The Fire Next Time (1963) and Andrea Ritchie’s Invisible No More (2017), which examines police violence against black women and women of color. 

Optional additional reading: